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1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
education whether it's how our criminal justice system functions. repass the light of judgment and would organize an powerful and often destructive ways based on simple binary calculations. we have a whole criminal justice system right now that's all too comfortable with targeting young, black men regardless of the rainbow of colors they represent. as long as we see that they are black is good enough. there is a fluidity here than in some ways some unlike adolphus is able to exploit. what i read in the story as whites could read that too. someone should the lineage whether they want to embrace it or not. i wanted to finish with two things. one, you describe in very powerful language the onset of jim crow and it made me think about reconstruction and see. that perhaps we don't talk enough about because it is this moment of tremendous achievement for that first generation of formerly enslaved people. you describe the tens of thousands of people in south carolina are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a de
dumbs. they talk about the economy, jobs, the climate, education and things that matter and they don't use the kind of language that we use in our campaign because they're scared or turn off the voters in the middle. at the center that since we don't like mandatory anything now come to be a champion of the mega millions lottery where your ticket is your voting stock of coming and if you look at the last mega millions where people camped out three days in advance to be given to get a ticket where of course let's face it the chance of winning was less than being struck by lightning twice in a day put a few hundred million dollars into this and we will up their turnout significantly. i think they are an easier way to move in a direction and a lot of things can be done. we have to do some changes in the system including the filibuster. >> can i add a word? >> i fifa to questions go to get their. how to make it better and isn't it the public's fault after dhaka? i think they fit very well together. if you have a mismatch, if you have ideologically polarized parties operating in a separati
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3